Wednesday, November 23, 2016

SCCY and Hornady Neglect Test


sccy cpx-2 pocket test hornady critical defense 147 grain torture test review














A while back, I made a torture test series on the SCCY CPX-2. I put it through a bunch of extreme tests, and the SCCY functioned very well. Even though it functioned well, many viewers were complaining that the tests were not very realistic. So, here is a realistic test for you.


I carry my SCCY quite a bit. I normally clean my carry guns every other month or so, even if I don’t fire them, in order to get the dust and grime out. Recently, I have not. It has been months since I have cleaned my SCCY, and it shows. It looks pretty close to what the SCCY did in the Extreme Pocket Lint Test where I emptied a vacuum cleaner into a SCCY CPX-2.

sccy cpx-2 pocket test hornady critical defense 147 grain torture test review

Another factor is the ammunition. I carry with Horandy Critical Defense 147 grain hollow points. This ammo has been in my SCCY for years. It has constantly been handled, loaded and unloaded from the SCCY, chambered and re-chambered, and so on. The oil and sweat on my hands kill metal. The rounds are very tarnished, the cases are worn, and some rounds even look like the cases may be slightly cracked.

sccy cpx-2 pocket test hornady critical defense 147 grain torture test review
What did look great after all this were the Traction Grips I put on it years ago. I was not paid to say this. I really like these grips. They are only slightly peeling up on the bottom, but these things are holding up through almost daily carrying in my pocket in the Florida heat, and they are not even an expensive upgrade to your firearm.

sccy cpx-2 pocket test hornady critical defense 147 grain torture test review
Back to the matter at hand: I decided to take the SCCY to the range, fire off all eleven rounds, and see what happened.

Disclaimer: SCCY recommends only firing limited amounts of +P ammunition through your CPX-2. If you have an older model, they don’t recommend it at all. SCCY, Hornady, and East Orange Shooting Sports (the range I went to) would not condone firing a firearm or ammunition in this condition. Make sure your firearm is in good working order, and your ammunition looks to be in good shape.

Not surprisingly, the SCCY and the ammo worked flawlessly. The first few shots did go left, but that could have been me since I don’t have much experience with +P in a SCCY. The first round did throw some dust in my face, but if that was the only thing, I can live with that.

So there you have it! It’s a real world and realistic test. It worked fine. Check out the video below for the shooting at the range to see all the dust that came out of it. 

Like what you see? Don’t for get to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more. Also be sure to like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter! You’ll be glad you did. Trust me!




Thursday, March 3, 2016

I Love The 80s, And Its Guns

80s 1980s guns calico m900 tec9 9mm ganster guns assault weapons ban














I like posting good quality content, but this is one of those instances where a quick expression of love and a good picture will do. I love the 80s: the movies, the music, the style, the cars, and of course the firearms. 

It was a time for firearms where really anything went. Revolvers were finally taking a back seat to reliable semi automatics (besides the 1911). Manufacturers were coming up with new designs. Some were cheap (like the Tec-9 and Mac guns), and others were more unique and expensive (like the Calico M900).  


Either way, firearms from that time period just seem to have a cool factor. Maybe they were not the most reliable (even though I have had minimal issues with firearms from then that people say are awful), but they were and still are fun. It’s one of those things that fits with the saying, “they don’t make them like they used to.” Some would argue that’s for good reason, but I disagree. 

However, with the Clinton Ban of 1994, these iconic firearms were done. They are now starting to fetch a premium. Even the cheap ones (like the Tec-9 and Mac10/11) from back the 80s can go for quite a bit now. Dare I say these things are becoming collector firearms? I guess it depends on the buyer. They all have that sort of a cool factor that for some, including me, can go a long way. 

So that’s my confession for my love of the 80s, especially the firearms. What firearms do you love from the 80s? Let me know! Like what you read? Don’t forget to check us on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube! Thanks for stopping by!

80s 1980s guns calico m900 tec9 9mm ganster guns assault weapons ban


Thursday, January 14, 2016

History of the Tec-9 and Dating a Tec-9

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number














If you haven’t figured out by now, I like firearms. Every firearm has something about them that is interesting (although I haven’t found that in Hi-Point yet). Anyway, I recently became the owner of an infamous Tec-9. That’s right: the firearm seen as a gangster gun, and one that frequently jams, and when it is firing, it’s very inaccurate.

In short, I like mine! I have put hundreds of round through it with no problems. I had one failure to feed, but I was messing with the safety at that point, so it could have been user error. Accuracy was spot on at twenty feet. At forty, I was at least hitting the target. Regardless of how “cool” the little thing is, history, information, and age details were hard to find, and all over the place. In all of my gun books, the Tec-9 wasn’t mentioned once! So I have compiled as much information as I could, and put it here, in the event anyone is looking for what I was.


HISTORY

The company all started back in Sweden. In the early 1980s, the company Interdynamic AB created a firearm known as the “Interdynamic MP-9”. It was designed to be made cheaply being made out of plastic and stamped steel. The full auto sub gun was intended for military use, but no one showed much interest.

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number

The company decided that they wanted to continue with the design, so they made an updated, open-bolt, semi-auto version known as the KG-9 after opening a subsidiary company in the US. The company, located in Miami, Florida, became known as Interdynamic USA. Pretty soon after the simple blow back firearm was on the market, the ATF stepped in and banned the firearm after only 2,500 were made, stating that it was too easy to convert to fully automatic. “KG” stands for the company’s founders George Kellgern and Carlos Garcia.

The company redesigned the firearm to fire from a closed bolt, and it was renamed the KG-99. Around this time, George Kellgren (current founder of Kel-Tec) left the company. Carlos Garcia stepped in and renamed the company “Intratec”. Soon, the firearm became known as the Tec-9.

After that, the firearm started becoming seen as a bad thing in the eyes of many. Not only was it used by the bad guys in the TV show Miami Vice, but it started to become used by bad people in real life. It was seen used in multiple well known shootings, including the one at Columbine High School.

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number

After the Cleveland School massacre, the TEC-9 was added California's list of banned weapons. Garcia was resilient though and rebranded and renamed the firearm the Tec-DC9. The “DC” stood for “Designated for California”. In 1994, the manufacture of the Tec-9 was officially banned with the assault weapons ban. Still, the company did not give up.

The Tec-9 was completely redesigned cosmetically to meet the requirements to not fall into a banned category. Features such as the threaded barrel, barrel shroud, and forward pistol grip were dropped. These were known as the AB-10, which were sold with ten round magazines, though they could accept the higher capacity ones from previous models. “AB” stood for “After Ban”.

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number


Time went on, but eventually the company went out of business. They finally dissolved in 2001. Tec-9s can obviously still be found today for sale, and they are legal to own, so long as you follow all ATF and state laws regarding magazine capacity and stuff like that. The more original ones are said to be more reliable.

You can still find them relatively inexpensive, but as time goes on, prices are increasing. While these were cheap to make at one point, they now have that “cool” and “collectors” factor going for them. Anything pre-ban typically commands a premium as well, even if it’s something that can still be made today. While it may be a gangster gun, it does have that cool factor.


DATING YOUR TEC-9 (and more history) 

One of the issues I had with mine when I got it was not knowing the date of manufacture. Of course, since the company no longer exists, I couldn’t just call them up, give them the serial number, and ask for when it was made. For this, you have to do a bit of digging to find out what features your Tec-9 has, and when those were changed, added, and so on. To make that digging easier, I have complied here what I have found to be some useful information.

While there are a few sub models that exist, I’ll talk just about the “standard Tec-9”. More details on the other models can be found in this great post on ParallaxBill's Curio & Relic and Military Surplus Firearms Forums.

The first Tec-9s that were made (in 1984) were not too different from the previous KG-9s. The major change would be that the front sight was changed to a simple “button” sight. Only months after, people were damaging the firearms by shooting +P ammunition in them. To fix that, the previous recoil buffer was replaced with a threaded metal end cap. Following these changes so far?

In 1987, the company went bankrupt after a lawsuit. This is where things started to go wrong with the firearms in terms of reliability and such. So, if you find that you have a model made before 1987, if you use factory magazines and regular old 115 grain, ball ammo, you should be fine, and have a good firearm!

One of the first changes made was with the sights. The button sight was gone a replaced with a spot-welded stamped sight.

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number


The Tec-9 remained pretty much the same until about 1991 or 1992 when the pistol became the Tec-DC9. At this point, the biggest change was the sling points. Instead of two on the upper, it was changed to one point that attached between the upper and lower.

tec-9 ab-10 kg-9 kg-99 intradynamics inratec 9mm gangster review history accuraty date of manufacture serial number


After that came the AB-10.

So, to help you date your Tec-9 a little better, here are those key features listed to help you find the best date range of your firearm.
  • Front button sight – 1984 to mid 1987 (one of the originals)
  • Stamped front sight with two sling mounts on the upper – Mid 1987 to 1991/92
  • Stamped front sight with single sling mount – 1991/92 to 1994
I hope that all of this information was helpful, and that you were able to learn something about your current or future Tec-9. Like what you read? Don’t forget to check us on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube! Thanks for stopping by!


Twitter Delicious Facebook Digg Stumbleupon Favorites More

 
Design by Free WordPress Themes | Bloggerized by Lasantha - Premium Blogger Themes | GreenGeeks Review